Rattan exports to Vietnam delayed

Thu, 5 July 2012 Seun Son Rattan furniture sold in a shop. Photograph: Pha Lina/Phnom Penh Post Plans to export five tonnes of semi-finished rattan product to Vietnam are facing difficulties as the government has not yet issued an export license. The Cambodian Rattan Association signed a contract with a Vietnamese company to export the rattan product in April but the date has been delayed as the association is still waiting for government approval, specifically the Minister of Commerce, said Lib Cheang, President of the Cambodian Rattan Association and owner of Cambodian Rattan Craft Company. Local demand for rattan is limited and Lib Cheang’s shop only needs to produce 20 pieces of furniture per month, but if demand increases, he will double production but if approval is given and he can export next year, it will double or triple the amount he produces he said. Currently there are 11 rattan workshops in Phnom Penh and they require the import of raw materials from neighboring countries he said. “Vietnam ordered semi-finished rattan products to make furniture for houses, office buildings, hotels and restaurants” he said. Most rattan products are imported from Kampong Speu, Kampong Thom and Pursat provinces and the quality of the products is high if kept in shade, he said. Rattan raw materials can not only support local markets but may become an export material in the future, Lib Cheang said. Although plans to export semi-finished rattan-made furniture products are progressing slowly, a mid-July export date which he said is possible said Ou Rattana, president of the Cambodian Rattan Project under the World Wildlife Fund. The quantity of...

Thu, 5 July 2012 Seun Son A lightning rod on the roof of a new building at the Institude technology du Cambodge. Photograph: Hin Pisei/Phnom Penh Post Lightning strikes kill Cambodian people and destroy public properties every year. Because of concerns over this, the use of lightning protection equipment is increasing gradually, particularly in Phnom Penh. The National Committee for Disaster Management statistics said that in the first six months of 2012, there were 63 deaths from lightning across the country, 32 cattle were killed and 4 houses damaged. Ninety per cent of these were in rural areas. Reth Chantha, the owner of DEG, which imports lightning protection equipment from Spain, said that when construction increases, the demand for such equipment also increases, even if it costs more. He added that for the first six months of 2012, the demand for the equipment increased by some 30 to 40 per cent, compared to last year. He says his company was the first to import such equipment into Cambodia, and his company has had more than 1,000 customers since 2008. In 2009, when the construction and property sector in Cambodia was hit by the global financial crisis, the number of customers decreased. However, in 2011, demand started to increase. Reth added that lightning can damage both buildings and the electronic equipment inside them. He said “if lightning strikes people, it kills them, and if it strikes the building, the building will be damaged or the building’s life will be reduced.” He added that in rural areas, many people were interested in the equipment but they can not afford it. The...

Thu, 5 July 2012 CBRE Cambodia City Mall shopping centre. Photograph: Hin Pisei/Phnom Penh Post A new report from global property company CBRE says that the construction of shopping centres worldwide is continuing to grow, with 70 per cent of all planned construction happening in Asia. Growing middle class populations and retailer expansion are the chief drivers of the growth, leading to “unprecedented levels of construction, particularly in Asia,” the company says. Chinese cities currently dominate shopping centre construction activity. In the 180 cities around the world analysed by CBRE, exactly half of all the shopping centre space under construction is in China. Outside China, the most active markets are Abu Dhabi, Hanoi, Kuala Lumpur, New Delhi and Sao Paulo. Emerging markets such as China, Turkey, and India are considerably more active than the more mature markets of Western Europe and North America. In 2011, new shopping centres opened in 35 per cent of the cities covered in the survey, of which 50 were in emerging markets. In contrast, only five cities in western Europe saw the opening of a new centre last year. Sebastian Skiff, the Executive Director of CBRE Retail Asia said “Overall, retailers have shifted their focus to exploring new markets and new opportunities in which they are able to grow their businesses and carry out cross-border expansion initiatives. This strategic growth is contributing to the escalation of high quality retail space in emerging markets, such as China, Malaysia and Vietnam. These markets are seeing an influx of retailers and outside interest which consequently fuels the demand for new developments.” David George, Country Manager of CBRE...